How To Stay Strong And Athletic In Your 30’S, 40’S And Beyond

Past a certain age it’s a constant uphill struggle for men to get stronger, look better and perform at their best (and not just in sport!). If you’re older than in your twenties, this is starting to happen right now.


If you’re in your forties or fifties you’ve probably already experienced how much harder it can be. But all is not lost. So, pay attention if you want to find out why this is, and what you need to do if you want to perform optimally and look great in your 30’s, 40’s and beyond.


Past a certain age it’s a constant uphill struggle for men to get stronger, look better and perform at their best (and not just in sport!). If you’re older than in your twenties, this is starting to happen right now. If you’re in your forties or fifties you’ve probably already experienced how much harder it can be. But all is not lost. So, pay attention if you want to find out why this is, and what you need to do if you want to perform optimally and look great in your 30’s, 40’s and beyond. Let’s face the facts If you’re a man in your late-twenties, unless you’re doing something about it right now, you’re already on the physical decline. But what does this mean exactly? Muscular strength and power are some of the fastest to decline as we get older, and the beginning stages of this can happen when we’re in our mid-twenties. Now this, of course, isn’t old by any stretch, but there are some important changes already happening at this stage in your life, that can have a massive knock-on effect if nothing’s done about it. By understanding what’s happening you can adjust your training to work better for you. There’s a larger decline in muscular strength and power than any other area of fitness as we get older. Faster than muscle loss, and loss in endurance capacity. Also, the more complex the movement the greater rate of decline. For example, power output in an Olympic lift variation (snatch, clean and jerk) will decline faster than in a vertical jump. There’s no escaping it, but you do have the ability to fight some of it off. And no, your typical bodybuilding style training routine just won’t cut it. As a side note, women have it even worse than we do, as the age-related decline in peak power is much greater in women than in men and can start at an even earlier age. So consider your female clients, wives, girlfriends, and mothers when taking this information on board. However bad you think you have it, remember they have it worse! Now, it’s clear just from looking at the impressive totals you see in Powerlifting events that you can be in your 60’s, 70’s and even 80’s and still whooping the butt of most average guys. The International Powerlifting Federation (IPF) has men born in the 1940’s still getting over 550kg totals in the classic division. Therefore maintaining maximal strength in these lifts as we get older, albeit much harder, is still realistic for you if you play it smart. But there’s the key; you need to PLAY IT SMART. You can’t get away with what you used to. And this is often why many men find that they adapt their training as they’ve got older to “go lighter”. Going lighter and aiming for a higher number of reps per set might be smart if you feel it allows you to focus on technique, longer time under tension, and reduce the loading on your joints. But it’s a bad decision if you don’t NEED to do it, and if instead, you’ve trained a little smarter in the years prior. When you choose to “go lighter” and actively reducing the weight you’re using, there’s a lower force requirement and hence actually giving your body permission to get weaker, including the strength of your joints and connective tissues. Just look up “Wolff’s law” and you’ll instantly see how applying load to your bones helps keep them strong too. Key point: If you set your foundations correctly you sh